Chessboxing: A fusion of Boxing and Chess

This is definitely going to catch on.

It’s a sport using both brains and brawn, and victory is not just determined by knockout. But for the fighters in the ring, chessboxing is about more than just getting a check mate or a knock out.

It’s a sheer battle of wills.

The once underground sport which used to be a haven for nerds has now grown to be a popular blood sport among everyday fighters — and it is growing everyday. Not only does the sport, which combines chess and boxing, have its own world title, but it has a cult following.

And while it sounds a little strange to some, the young sport has two ways of winning and losing.

A match consists of 11 alternating rounds, six of chess, and five of boxing with standard rules applied for both sports. Victory is by checkmate, knockout, time-out in chess, or finally win by points in boxing.

To put it simply — the ways to win are lose are the same as competitive chess and boxing — chessboxing just affords twice the ways of both winning and losing.

While it’s not known exactly where and when it took off, the sport has been around in London since 2008, and according to Lewis had its first mention in a Japanese comic in the 1970s.

He reckons Australians would take to it, and the sport isn’t just for nerds.

It really is a game of chess first, boxing second.

But a strong boxer has equal right to compete, and in some ways has an advantage. You have to be strong in both disciplines, which is what makes it so much fun.

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